SpaceX and NASA on Sunday achieved a new place in the space world

Elon Musk’s rocket company SpaceX and the US Space Research Agency NASA on Sunday achieved a new place in the space world. In fact, NASA, along with SpaceX, has sent four passengers to the International Space Station (ISS) in a Falcon 9 spacecraft designed by Tesla.

This is the first such mission of NASA, in which the help of private spacecraft has been taken to send astronauts to ISS. The astronauts included in the ‘Crew Dragon Resilience Team’ have been sent to the ISS through this spacecraft.

The team consists of US Air Force colonel and astronaut Mike Hopkins, physicist Shannon Walker, Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi as well as naval commander and astronaut Victor Glover (who is the first black astronaut to spend the entire six months on the space station) Was sent to the ISS via Falcon 9 spacecraft.

SpaceX and NASA on Sunday achieved a new place in the space world
SpaceX and NASA on Sunday achieved a new place in the space world

Families of astronauts were present at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida during the mission launch. The family prayed for the astronauts at the launch and waved goodbye to them. Tesla CEO Elon Musk was not present during the Corona epidemic. However, SpaceX President Gwenne Shotwell was present during takeoff with NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstein.

So far, this crew has been named ‘Capsule Resilience’ in view of the challenges faced in the world in 2020. During takeoff, residents of Cape Convaral, a town near the Space Center, arrived to watch the mission in large numbers.

According to a series of tweets made before takeoff by NASA, the astronauts performed all the tests and the spacecraft was checked before takeoff. SpaceX’s first regular space flight uses a reused rocket named Falcon 9. It is developed and manufactured by SpaceX.

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstein told reporters that the mission meant operational flights could now begin for the ISS. He said, the history that is being made this time is what we call operational flight at the International Space Center.